CD 輸入盤

Viva La Vida

Rabito

基本情報

ジャンル
:
カタログNo
:
10467
組み枚数
:
1
レーベル
:
オリジナル盤発売年
:
2001
フォーマット
:
CD
クレジット
:

Arturo Velasco(Trombone),  Gerald Albright(Saxophone),  Harry Kim(Trumpet),  Rabito(Guitar (Acoustic)),  Rabito(Guitar (Electric)),  Rafael Padilla(Percussion),  Ramon Stagnaro(Guitar (Acoustic)),  Ramon Stagnaro(Guitar (Electric)),  Enrique Martinez(Accordion),  Abraham Laboriel(Bajo Sexto),  John Karpowich(Mezcla),  John Karpowich(Engineer),  Juan Carlos Fernandez(Producer),  Miguel "Bife" Provenzano(Arranger),  Miguel "Bife" Provenzano(Engineer),  Alan Silfen(Photography),  Bernie Grundman(Mastering),  Chris Bellman(Mastering),  John Coulter(Design),  Miguel "Bife" Provenzano(Programming),  Yolanda Tallavas(Production Coordination),  Carlos Murguia(Coros),  John Coulter(Graphic Design),  Leyla Hoyle(Coros),  Lucas Apestegui(Coros),  Seven To Heaven(Guest Appearance)

商品説明

If someone who didn't speak a word of Spanish and knew nothing about Rabito's background heard Viva la Vida, he/she would have no idea that the lyrics have a Christian message. Musically, Viva la Vida is quite typical of the more adult-oriented Latin pop albums that came out in the early 2000s. Sleek, smooth, and polished, Viva la Vida has the type of sound that is essentially a Latin equivalent of adult contemporary -- it's no coincidence that a lot of bilingual Latinos who are fans of Jose Jose and Rocio Durcal also listen to Celine Dion. But lyrically, Viva la Vida is hardly typical of adult-oriented Latin pop (or Latin adult contemporary, if you prefer). While Jose Jose, Durcal, and Julio Iglesias specialize in songs about romantic love, Rabito brings a Christian perspective to tracks like Le He Prestado la Mano a Jesus and Me Voy a la Montana. Viva la Vida is every bit as Christian-minded as a collection of Mahalia Jackson or Clara Ward recordings, although a non-Spanish-speaking listener who heard one of Rabito's songs playing in the background in a Latin restaurant (and knew nothing about his history) would have no idea that he wasn't a secular romantic singer. Someone who doesn't understand Spanish would have no idea that the title El Hombre Necesita de Dios means a man needs God, or that Escuche la Voz is urging people to hear the voice of a higher power. And it isn't surprising that a Christian singer would use Latin pop to get his message across -- these days, Christian music can be anything from heavy metal to urban contemporary to country. Those who are open to hearing a religious message will find Viva la Vida to be a pleasing, if somewhat predictable, album of adult-oriented Latin pop. ~ Alex Henderson, Rovi

収録曲   

  • 01. Amor Mio (03:00)
  • 02. ...Que Te Quiero (04:13)
  • 03. Vivir Sin Ti (04:29)
  • 04. Escuche la Voz (03:58)
  • 05. Mi Corazon Esta de Fiesta (03:04)
  • 06. Hombre Necesita de Dios (03:51)
  • 07. He Prestado la Mano a Jesus (03:51)
  • 08. Yo Probe Tu Amor (03:15)
  • 09. Sin Palabras (03:49)
  • 10. Me Voy a la Montana (05:05)

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人物・団体紹介

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Rabito

Argentine-Latin CCM singer/songwriter and producer Rabito (born Juan Carlos Fernandez) played in a rock en espanol band called Los Hampones before getting involved in the contemporary Christian music scene. In 1981, he turned to spiritual lyrics, delivered on his first album, titled Pueblo de Dios. Creciendo Dia A Dia and Bajo La Luz De Dios followed soon after. Rabito settled in the U.S. before r

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